Integration

Small Town Life Artifacts

Integraton and civil rights demonstration in West Point VA

“Parents Defy Jail Threats; Promise Fight to the Finish”

The headline in a local paper describing West Point citizens fighting for their civil rights.

Integraton and civil rights demonstration in West Point VA

Beverly Allen High School, 1953

Students prepared to march to West Point High School on the first day of school. They were denied entry to West Point High School.

Integration hearing

Integration Meeting

Attorneys Oliver Hill and Spotswood Robinson represented George Leakes, Elaine Bowen and other members of the West Point 29 (students) for integrated schools.*

School children

School Children

Eighth, ninth and tenth grade classes at the West Point Colored School in 1935. The principal at the time was Mrs. B. C. Flournoy Gravely pictured here in the last row. The teacher was Miss Helen Cauthorne, first on the first row.

Third, fourth and fifth grade class

School Children

Third, fourth and fifth grade classes at the Beverly Allen School in 1948-49. The school was built by parents and volunteer labor and served the African American community.

Pioneer Graduating Class 1939

Pioneer Graduating Glass, 1939

Pioneer was later to be called The Beverly Allen High School.

Pictured back row left to right: James Epps, Mrs. B. C. Flournoy Gravely and unknown. Front row left to right: James Curtis, Mary Harris and Leon Stubbs.

The Beverly Allen School West Point VA

The Beverly Allen High School, 1947-1952

The school was built by parents and volunteer labor and served the African American community. After it was no longer used as a school it was used as a culture center for the community.

St. Clare Walker High School graduating class 1957

Saint Clare Walker High School

Rosetta Dobbins Jarvis' 1957 graduating class of St. Clair Walker High School in Middlesex County. She and other West Point students attended school there when other classmates were bused to King William to attend school. Rosetta was among the students whose parents refused to send them to King William.